Monday, 5 December 2016

Critical Review.

I read a very disturbing conversation on social media this morning. An indie author, who had read another indie author's book wasn't happy with it, for what I understood to be valid reasons (quality of writing, editing, etc), and had gone on social media with the question:

What do I do?

The question eluded to the review. Should the author leave a bad review or not?

This directly relates to more and more posts I'm putting on here. Remember my last post? Where I talked about the slurry filled pool of bloated rubbish that was ending up on Amazon because no one had any pride?

It really helps when a percentage of your peers advise you not to leave a bad review. 

Largely, the conversation had about a quarter of people saying to leave a good review anyway (!), a quarter saying to ask the author if they wanted a bad review or not, a quarter saying to not leave any review, and the last quarter saying to leave a bad, but constructive, review.

And there's me sitting in the corner.

Weeping for the industry.

If a book has problems then a review should critique those problems. It should address the issues of the reader and constructively address them. 

Or alternatively, look at the other side. If you make something public like, I don't know, your writing, then perhaps you should expect criticism.

And don't blame the person criticizing you if the crit is valid.

You see, constructive criticism helps the author. Even if they don't know it. Yet. Because as an author learning to take criticism constructively is another skill to be mastered. But it improves the writing.

You know. It HELPS.


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